Kip Moore

Me And My Kind Tour 2016

Kip Moore

with special guest Jon Pardi, Runaway June

Thu, December 1, 2016

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

Terminal 5

New York, NY

$36.50 advance / $37.00 day of show / $119 VIP

This event is all ages

Kip Moore
Kip Moore
Over the last couple of years, Kip Moore spent most of his time on the road, building one of country music's most loyal audiences show by show and plotting what would become his sophomore album, Wild Ones. He was a road warrior, living out of a tour bus with his bandmates and playing more than 200 shows per year. For a songwriter who'd grown up in a quiet pocket of southern Georgia, performing to crowds across the world — crowds that knew every word to his best-selling debut album, Up All Night — felt like a dream come true.

Somewhere along the way, though, the highway became a lonely place. The routine was always the same: pull into town, play a show, pack up and leave. There was no stability, no comfort. Things weren't much easier at home in Nashville, where Moore —whose first album had sent three songs to the top of the country charts, including "Beer Money" and "Hey Pretty Girl" —found himself receiving plenty of unsolicited advice from people who wanted to keep the hits coming…at any cost.

"Once you start having a little bit of success," he says, "all of a sudden, there's a lot of opinions about who you should be, what you should be doing, how it should be marketed. A lot of those opinions are great, but Wild Ones was influenced by me saying, 'This is just who I am. I'm not gonna do what other people are doing. I'm not chasing a trend. I'm gonna do the kind of music I wanna do, and the kind of music I think my fans wanna hear, and that's the end of the story.'"

From amphitheater tours with Dierks Bentley to his own headlining tours across America, Moore has spent the last three years learning what, exactly, his fans want to hear. He's a genuine road warrior, armed with a live show that mixes the bombast and wild desperation of Bruce Springsteen with the rootsy stomp of Merle Haggard. It's a sound built on space and swagger. A sound that bangs as hard as it twangs. A sound caught somewhere between blue-collar country music and stadium-sized rock & roll. And that's the sound that Moore's fans, who've already catapulted him to PLATINUM-selling heights, want to hear.

When it came time to create new music for his second album, Wild Ones, Moore didn't have to look very far for inspiration. He just took a look around, taking stock of the world as it flew by his bus window at highway speed.

"Everything that's taken place over the last two years —this traveling circus, these shows, the band, the toll that the road can take on you but also the exuberance it can bring —it all inspired the record," he explains. "It's a record about what we've gone through, and I wanted the music to match the intensity of what we do every night onstage. We never go through the motions, no matter how tired and exhausted we are."

Moore wrote or co-wrote all of Wild Ones' thirteen tracks, often teaming up with songwriters like Dan Couch or Weston Davis. More than a few songs were born on the road, where Moore found himself coming up with new ones during soundchecks, inside backstage dressing rooms, and in his bunk at night. He'd arrange the songs, too, coming up with bass parts, guitar licks and drum patterns in addition to the melodies. Sometimes, he'd write some lyrics, scrap them, then write a completely different set. The emphasis wasn't on creating the largest catalog of songs in the shortest time possible; it was on funneling the feeling of a Kip Moore concert into a single album, no matter how much time it took.

Driven forward by electric guitars and gang vocals, "Lipstick" is the album's most heartfelt tribute to the road, with each verse rattling off a list of the favorite cities Moore and his bandmates have played in the past. Other songs, like "That Was Us," take a look backward, sketching a picture of the archetypal small-town Saturday nights that filled Moore's teenage years in Georgia. "Magic," anchored by one of the anthemic, open-armed choruses of Moore's career, is loud and lovely, and "Comeback Kid" packs its punch the opposite way: by dialing back the volume and delivering quiet praise to the underdog in all of us.

Befitting an album that was largely inspired by —and written on — the road, Moore recorded Wild Ones during quick breaks in his touring schedule. He'd book one or two days of studio time, then hit the road for three months, then return to Nashville and book more sessions. Gradually, the album started to take shape. Brett James, his longtime friend and ally, co-produced the project.

"We created a lot of space in this record," Moore says proudly. "It's not a bunch of people playing all over the place. We tracked a lot of the record with just a three-piece band. If you go to most Nashville recording sessions, there's gonna be six or seven people in the room. But we recorded this one with less people, just to allow the fans to actually listen to what's going on. It makes everything sound bigger." "Big." Perhaps that's the best description for Wild Ones, a super-sized record inspired by the grit, grind, and glamour of the live shows that have helped make Moore a country favorite. For Moore, going big was the only option.

"I've always felt like the guy whose cards are stacked against him," he says. "I've always been the underdog, but I also say, 'You can count me out for a minute, but don't think I'll stay down for very long.'”
with special guest Jon Pardi
with special guest Jon Pardi
California native and Capitol Records Nashville’s Jon Pardi is undeniably country, with an evident influence from country music pioneers from Dwight Yoakam to Merle Haggard. His laid back, fun-loving approach towards life, charisma and authenticity strike a chord with country audiences as he regularly sells out shows across the country and prepares for the June 17 release of his second studio album, California Sunrise. Lead single “Head Over Boots” is a swinging, mid-tempo tune currently climbing country radio’s Top 15, gaining Top 15 in country track sales, surpassing 33.6 million in streaming and noticeably, immediately connecting with fans.

California Sunrise is the follow-up to his highly-praised debut, Write You A Song, which landed on multiple ‘Best of 2014’ lists including the Los Angeles Times’ Mikael Wood’s all-genre Top 10 and both Rhapsody’s and Taste of Country’s Top 10 Country Albums. Write You A Song features the Gold-selling Top 10 “Up All Night” and fan-favorites “Missin’ You Crazy,” “What I Can’t Put Down” and “When I’ve Been Drinkin.’”

Pardi has toured with Dierks Bentley, Luke Bryan, Eric Church, was hand-picked by country legend Alan Jackson for his 25th anniversary tour, and recently, he wrapped his own highly-successful All Time High Tour.
Runaway June
There's a sound that hasn't been heard on country radio in quite some time – the sound of organic, three-part female harmonies, ringing strings and stories that speak the language of modern women everywhere. It's a sound that was the backbone of a little group known as The Dixie Chicks, and now it's making a comeback through a vocal trio called Runaway June. Rootsy, brightly colored and mixing bluegrass tradition with dusty desert cool, Runaway June is comprised of three very different women who fuse their own influences to create a style country fans have been craving.

Lead singer and guitarist Naomi Cooke grew up in Florida enchanted with the other-worldly vocals of Alison Krauss, then made her way to a stage in Nashville's world-famous Tootsie's Orchid Lounge.

Singer and mandolin picker Hannah Mulholland was raised in Malibu, Calif., a nature-loving hippie chick who latched on to the liberating messages of Sheryl Crow and began writing her own music at 6 years old.

And singer/guitarist Jennifer Wayne – another California native – is a Garth Brooks lover so dedicated to country music she gave up a pro tennis career to write songs in Nashville (like Eric Paslay's "She Don't Love You"), and happens to be the granddaughter of Hollywood legend John Wayne.

Each of these talented young ladies were unsurprisingly Dixie Chicks fans, and each could have been a solo artist in her own right. But after forming a friendship and discovering their shared love for acoustic soul, soaring vocals and do-it-yourself positivity, Runaway June was born – a name that nods to their common bonds. Both Jennifer's grandmother and one of Naomi's sisters are named June, and Hannah completed a life-changing 25-day, 220-mile hike in the month of June. Plus, they all felt pulled to "run away" from their homes and toward their dreams.

Part of the Wheelhouse Records imprint of BBR Music Group, the first thing listeners will notice is the trio's obvious musical connection, and their stunning three-part harmonies – natural and effortless in feel.

"I grew up in choirs singing low harmony, Jen naturally sings high harmony and Naomi has this perfect mid-range voice," Hannah explains, surrounded by her bandmates in a Music Row conference room. "If we all switched positions, it wouldn't be the same."
Just as impressive is their musicianship, a modern twist on a way-back sound that sets Runaway June apart from the pack as a true, self-contained band.

"We've always had a Western feel to the music in some way, and kind of a cowboy feel," Jennifer says. "But not rhinestone-y — rough and leather-y."

"Our brand of music is tied to country's roots in that it's all real instruments and real sounds," Hannah adds. "But I feel like we have a modern take on it lyrically."

Indeed, as strong women who are not afraid to take risks in achieving their goals,
empowerment is a recurring theme for Runaway June – and not just female empowerment.

"We want to be including," says Naomi. "We want to sing to everybody, so we steer away from being super negative to either gender."

"We don't do man-bashing songs," Jennifer clarifies with a laugh.

In a time when female voices have been squeezed into a few narrow categories at country radio – the bad girls, the good girls, the crusaders – Runaway June want to break the mold. They know women's lives are far more diverse, and even though their sound is rooted in the past, their stories are very much of the here and now.

"You won't hear a lot of synthetic anything in our music," says Naomi, "but we're modern women living in a modern world, so what we say and what we want to write and sound like is modern, without even trying."

Continues Jennifer, "Everything we write is what we know – it's from the heart."

Case in point is Runaway June's debut single "Lipstick" – a breakup song that's actually upbeat and positive. Its central idea is that sometimes breakups ARE for the best, and that a girl should be with someone who ruins her lipstick, not her mascara. But holding true to their promise not to be man-bashers, the girls barely even mention the heartbreaker in the story, instead focusing on the good guy who's still out there.

"It's not preachy," says Naomi. "But it's something I would want to say to my little sisters."

With their high-voltage harmonies kicking the song off, "Lipstick" (produced by Mickey Jack Cones) is the perfect intro to this new group.

"It's like 'Here we are! We're a vocal trio. It's gonna be harmonies,'" says Jennifer. "For some reason, whatever we have together really works. I feel like what I'm lacking they have and what they're lacking I have. We're great individually, but we're the best together."

"Without planning it, we all have the same taste in music and the same feel for it, and the same things we want to say," Naomi agrees. "You can't really design that."

With that, the new trio lock eyes and smile, sharing a silent moment of realization before Jennifer sums up their happiness: "I think we all know we have something special."
Venue Information:
Terminal 5
610 W 56th St
New York, NY, 10019
http://www.terminal5nyc.com/