Bad Religion

Bad Religion

The Bronx, Polar Bear Club

Tue, March 26, 2013

Doors: 6:30 pm / Show: 7:30 pm

Terminal 5

New York, NY

$28.50 advance / $32 day of show

Sold Out

This event is all ages

Bad Religion
Bad Religion
Preeminent punk band Bad Religion will release their new album True North this January 22nd on Epitaph Records. In a world still brimming with rampant anti intellectualism, inequality and oppression, the band’s signature brand of sonically charged humanist dissent seems as relevant as ever. On their newest record, the storied band deliberately revisits and refines the powerful and melodic Southern California sound they helped to define on albums such as Suffer, No Control and Recipe For Hate.

“We went back to our original mission statement of short concise bursts of melody and thought,” co-songwriter and guitarist Brett Gurewitz explains. “The intent was to record stripped down punk songs without sacrificing any conceptual density.”

The band began in the sprawling suburbs surrounding Los Angeles. As insurgent teenage punks they offered an impassioned musical counterpoint to a dystopian culture of consumerism and anti intellectualism. Founding members Greg Graffin, Brett Gurewitz and Jay Bentley were eventually joined by Brian Baker of hardcore pioneers Minor Threat and a supremely talented drummer named Brooks Wackerman. In the following years the band was a major force in reinvigorating the modern punk movement, produced beloved international hits such as “Infected,” "21st Century (Digital Boy)" and “Sorrow” and has maintained an impassioned worldwide following of young and old who continue embrace a music that gives voice to, and celebrates, their dissent.

Produced by the band and Joe Barresi, True North celebrates the power of cogent punk in the face of personal pain and adversity. It is one of the band’s most emotionally accessible albums to date. Beneath the bristling guitars and surging drums exists one of the most cathartic works of the band’s career. “I think working within certain restrictions took away the mental aspect and let us devote more attention to conveying feeling,” co-writer and guitarist Greg Graffin says. “We all go through pain and the best elements of punk give us hope in those dark times.”

There are tracks which, as the band has continuously done throughout their career, ardently address world issues. There is the hard charging “Robin Hood In Reverse,” "Land of Endless Greed" and “Dharma And The Bomb” which features guitarist Gurewitz singing over some classic Southern Cal punk. As Gurewitz explains, "The song’s lyrics speak about the danger of radical religious movements inheriting the fruits of science (like nuclear weapons) without the benefit of its liberal traditions."

The album’s first single is a joyously propulsive anthem succinctly called “F*ck You.” As Graffin explains, “If any band should have a song with that title it should be us. It just sounds like a perfect Bad Religion song.”

Other tracks like mid tempo “Hello Cruel World” veer into a far more expressive terrain. The album’s title song “True North” utilizes a wall of guitars and charged beat to explore issues of alienation and loss informed by Graffin’s recent life experiences. “The song is written from the perspective of a kid who is running away,” Graffin explains. “He says ‘I’m out of here, I’m off to find true north.’ It’s about recognizing that you don’t fit in and trying to find a truth and purpose. Those are all classic punk themes. We still remember exactly what it feels like to be a disaffected kid in this world. And I think we were able to convey that particularly well on this album.”

His cohort Gurewitz adds, “I think we both really responded to the challenge of writing short and fast songs on this record. The constraints set us free. Like moves in a game of chess, there are really as many variations as there are stars in the galaxy.”
The Bronx
The Bronx
For the better part of a decade, The Bronx have played provocateurs. From their beginnings as an attack-mode hardcore band to their hardscrabble lives as road warriors to the twist of fate that led to their alter ego Mariachi El Bronx — an episode that itself was an act of defiance — the Los Angeles quintet has embraced a fierce independence.

And as they prepare for the February 2013 release of their fourth rock album, one thing is for certain: The Bronx have grown up, but they haven’t gone soft.

“This represents the highest evolution of the band, which is exactly how it should be be,” vocalist Matt Caughthran says of the album fans inevitably will come to know as The Bronx (IV). “We’re the same guys, but we would never make the same record twice. And because of everything that’s happened with El Bronx, we’ve grown as musicians. And that’s why on this record you’ll hear that the songs are driving everything.”

The Bronx burst on the scene in 2002 with music that recalled the heyday of L.A. punk — artillery-fire guitars and percussion punctuating anguished missives about the perils of street life and the frayed edges of society. Now the band (Caughthran, guitarists Joby J. Ford and Ken Horne, bassist Brad Magers and drummer Jorma Vik) frames its aggression in different and, yes, more sophisticated ways.

“We made an effort to trim the fat and focus the ideas a lot more,” Ford explains. “It helped that we’re working in our own studio, with our friend (producer/engineer) Beau Burchell, and that we know what we want to do and how to get there very quickly.”

The Bronx (IV) also reflects a certain musicality that the band acknowledges is a carryover from its work over two albums as a mariachi outfit. Mariachi El Bronx started as an act of rebellion in 2006 when the punk band took offense to being asked to do an acoustic performance and showed up in sombreros with a mariachi arrangement of the song “Dirty Leaves. Now El Bronx has taken on a life of its own, with its reverent, enthusiastic take on the genre winning fans worldwide.

“I think that after doing the mariachi records, it gave us a whole new outlook and a more structured way of writing music. We figured out what works best,” Vik says. “Everything is less spazzy. Matt doesn’t scream as much, but he’s got that thing in his voice where he can scream in pitch — mariachi has helped his confidence as a singer and ours as songwriters.”

Indeed, Caughthran admits, “I found that a lot of melodies crept in subliminally and I didn’t even realize it until later.”

“Will both bands eventually encapsulate each other and become this horrible mariachi rock monster?” Ford says, laughing. “I wonder.”

The Bronx (IV) shows no overt sign of that. It does, however, seethe with band’s characteristic rage, even if that rebellion is not quite as youthful as it once was.

The single “Youth Wasted” is Caughthran’s fearless look back “at a lot of the bad decisions I made,” he says. “I’d like to think that as a human being I have the best intentions and I’m a good person. Sometimes it doesn’t always work out that way.”

“Valley Heat” makes The Bronx sound like elder statesmen. “That song’s about people who will do anything and everything just to call attention to themselves,” Caughthran says. “Sometimes you see young people, especially young bands, just doing all the wrong things. And you shake your head. It’s easier for me to write a scathing song about that stuff than it is to give advice.”

And two of the new songs were borne of The Bronx’s tour adventures. “Under the Rabbit” refers to a friend of the band who smuggled booze around a festival under her rabbit fur coat. “The Unholy Hand” was inspired by a bizarre sequence of events in which Ford suffered an injury to his right hand and later, during a chance meeting with a man who turned out to be a gang member, offended him by offering a handshake with his left. “He said, ‘I ain’t shaking that — that’s the unholy hand, bro,’” Ford recalls. “I thought, ‘song title.’”

Call it another chapter of Bronx lore. For a band that survived two near-death experiences involving their tour van in their first 18 months, that weathered label problems that undermined albums No. 2 and 3 and that even made it through a mid-career summer on the Warped Tour, it’s all part of destiny that only occasionally feels in the Bronx’s hands.

“We made this record on our terms,” Ford says. “We don’t have to rent a studio for a zillion dollars or pay some mega-producer to help us, because we’ve become self-reliant. It’s been a long road and we’re proud of it.”
Polar Bear Club
Polar Bear Club
Polar Bear Club is an American post-hardcore/indie rock band from Syracuse, upstate New York. Formed in 2005, the band currently consists of vocalist Jimmy Stadt, lead guitarist Chris Browne, rhythm guitarist Nate Morris, bass guitarist Erik Michael "Goose" Henning and drummer Emmett Menke.
Venue Information:
Terminal 5
610 W 56th St
New York, NY, 10019
http://www.terminal5nyc.com/