The Neighbourhood

The Neighbourhood

Lovelife, Ghost Loft

Thu, October 17, 2013

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

Terminal 5

New York, NY

$22.50 advance / $27 day of show

Sold Out

This event is all ages

The Neighbourhood
The Neighbourhood
In early 2012 a mysterious band appeared online. The group, The Neighbourhood, revealed no biographical information, no photos and no backstory, offering only a moody track titled "Female Robbery." Fans and the press were confounded, scouring the Internet for any information that might lead them to the identity of these musicians. Pieces of the puzzle, some reflecting reality and some not so much, began to emerge. The Neighbourhood were a quintet. They were from California despite the British spelling of their name. They had a second track, "Sweater Weather," which had an accompanying -- and equally dark -- video.

Although The Neighbourhood's identity remained hazy, it became clear that the music they were making felt transformative to critics and fans alike. The evocative combination of rock instruments with R&B and hip-hop aesthetics seemed, in many ways, revelatory, a reimagining of sounds that seemed to make people clamor for more information with even greater fervor. In April, BBC Radio One DJ Zane Lowe, an early champion of the group, let it slip that The Neighbourhood was the handiwork of musician Jesse Rutherford, a resident of Newbury Park, CA. By early May, as the band unveiled a free, self-released EP titled "I'm Sorry," it became understood that the identity of this young band was, ultimately, secondary to the music itself.

So who are The Neighbourhood? In essence, the group, which formed in August of 2011, is a collection of five friends who make music together. They're headed by Rutherford, a 21-year-old singer who has dabbled in various genres, including hip-hop, before crafting the merge of sounds that categorizes The Neighbourhood's style. Their debut EP produced by Justyn Pilbrow, who brought Emile Haynie onboard to collaborate on "Female Robbery." The EP, recorded at the end of last year, is composed of shadowy, emotional music with visuals to match. And it's all part of the band's master plan.

"I always have a strong vision before I go into anything," Rutherford says. "I don't know how to make music any other way. It was all in my head, and that vision for the music was to make hip-hop beats with guitars and I was going to sing and rap over them. We wanted to do that hip-hop aesthetic on an indie platform."

"I'm Sorry," a five-song disc, is a precursor to the band's debut album, which is also being produced by Pilbrow and Haynie. The album, expected out March 2013, will expand the group's moody sensibility, which pairs brooding layers of instrumentals with Rutherford's hip-hop-inspired croon. The style, which the band has dubbed "black and white" due to its confident inspirations, is based largely in rhythm, as evidenced by the EP. "When I started in music I started doing drums and then I started doing vocals," Rutherford explains. "And then I combined the two together because to me rapping is just rhythmic vocals. I think the rhythm of hip-hop is really what got me into it. It's not just words being said; it's about how the words are said."

In the end, all you need to know about The Neighbourhood is in that music and in those words. There are more facts, more pieces of the puzzle, more information to unveil. But what's the fun in being given the full picture when you can slowly discover it for yourself? It's better to leave some mystery lingering. Because, after all, it's that unknowing that brought The Neighbourhood to people's attention to begin with.
Lovelife
Lovelife
Despite only splitting up a matter of months ago, Viva Brother have returned and relaunched themselves as new act Lovelife.

The band have posted three new tracks online, all of which you can hear by scrolling down to the bottom of the page and clicking.

The tracks, which are titled 'Brave Face', 'She Makes It Look So Easy' and 'Love Rush', are a far-cry from their former guise as a rock band heavily inspired by 1990s Britpop, with that sound replaced with a slow, synth-led pop sound, more akin to the likes of Hurts and Yazoo.

--NME
Ghost Loft
Ghost Loft
"The growing buzz around Ghost Loft or the moniker for LA producer Danny Choi has steadily been building and the anticipation for his debut full-length is probably at it's highest right now. His latest tune called "So High" is a ambient and alternative journey that leaves you with positive energy. It's a relaxed song, but the layers of sounds and vocals are incredible. Not only do I expect some more lush music from Choi, but I can guarantee there will be a ton of great remixes by other producers of his songs."~ohsofreshmusic.com
Venue Information:
Terminal 5
610 W 56th St
New York, NY, 10019
http://www.terminal5nyc.com/